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November 29, 2000 Vol. 11, No. 14

Special Edition: 2000 REPORT CARD

M19 of 24 Maryland Local School Systems
Improve Composite Scores Over Last Year

ta Schools and school systems in all areas of Maryland demonstrated that 11 years of education reform is producing higher achievement as the statewide composite index of the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program increased to a record 45.3 percent of students at satisfactory on the 2000 MSPAP tests.

The state composite index increased 1.5 percentage points in 2000. Nineteen of the state’s 24 local school systems increased their composite scores over 1999. Seventeen systems set new all-time composite index bests.

Maryland’s school reform program began in 1989 after the Governor’s Commission on School Performance recommended improving the state’s educational system. Statewide testing of third, fifth and eighth graders in six subject areas began in 1993.

"We have long remained confident that school reform was the right path for Maryland’s children," said Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick. "We still do not have all of the answers, and we are not yet satisfied. But the stories of success around the state confirm that we continue to build one of the nation’s top educational structures with a combination of hardworking and dedicated teachers and administrators, high standards and an unmatched accountability system."

Kent County, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, gained 2.0 points on its MSPAP composite score to increase its system composite to 62.0 percent, the top performance in the state for the second straight year. Howard County gained 2.1 points to increase to 61.4 percent.

Baltimore City, the state’s lowest-performing system overall since testing began, continued to show progress. The city posted an increase for the fourth consecutive year. Its gain of 3.5 points was the largest in the system’s history.

Twelve school systems posted MSPAP composite index scores of 50 percent or higher, four more than in 1999.

t WHERE WE STAND

                        MSPAP Composite Scores      By School System: 1993-2000ewide

School System

1993

2000

Gain

Allegany

26.5

47.4

20.9

Anne Arundel

36.6

47.5

10.9

Baltimore City

10.4

20.5

10.1

Baltimore Co.

34.9

50.9

16.0

Calvert

34.6

55.0

20.4

Caroline

25.1

49.8

24.7

Carroll

42.0

54.1

12.1

Cecil

32.4

51.5

19.1

Charles

30.1

46.7

16.6

Dorchester

21.0

42.7

21.7

Frederick

44.5

51.0

6.5

Garrett

35.6

48.2

12.6

Harford

38.4

55.7

17.3

Howard

48.7

61.4

12.7

Kent

32.6

62.0

29.4

Montgomery

46.4

55.4

9.0

Prince George's

21.5

31.0

9.5

Queen Anne's

34.4

50.8

16.4

St. Mary's

27.7

49.4

21.7

Somerset

25.3

38.7

13.4

Talbot

28.4

44.4

16.0

Washington

31.9

54.4

22.5

Wicomico

26.3

43.0

16.7

Worcester

25.3

50.2

24.9

 

Highlights: Raising the Level of Achievement Across Maryland

The accomplishments of Maryland schools over the past year contributed to major MSPAP achievements in 2000:

  • Maryland has gained 13.6 percentage points on MSPAP composite since testing began in 1993. The first year composite was 31.7 percent at satisfactory. It was 45.3 percent this year.
  • 83 schools scored at least 70 percent satisfactory in 2000 on MSPAP. In 1993, only 11 schools met that standard.
  • 12 systems (four more than 1999) had composite scores of at least 50 percent. Five others are within 2.6 points of that mark.
  • 21 of 24 school systems had 40 percent or more students at satisfactory. In 1993, only four systems reached that figure.
  • Queen Anne’s County, Washington County and Wicomico County are the only systems to make gains in every year of the testing program.
  • 58 of 93 (62 percent) schools on the reconstitution-eligible list improved over 1999.

 

‘As We Progressed in Our First Decade, We Also Planned Ahead’

The first 10 years of education reform in Maryland were an aggressive pursuit of the basic principle that all children can learn.

As the program developed, success stories from all geographic and demographic areas of the state increasingly demonstrated the truth behind this principle. The 2000 results from the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program showed significant gains from low-achieving schools and from schools that had previously shown various degrees of progress.

Following the contention of State Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick that even high-achieving schools must continue to progress, some of the historically top schools in the state made additional major gains.

"When we established school reform, we sought to create a program that would benefit all of the children of Maryland," said Dr. Grasmick. "Along the way, we learned and we adapted. But we never wavered from our principles—or our high standards. In every aspect, we looked toward the future. As we progressed in our first decade, we also planned ahead for the next decade."

Some of the notable success stories of the past year:

Pimlico Elementary (Baltimore City) and Thomas S. Stone Elementary (Prince George’s) became the second and third schools ever to be removed from the state’s reconstitution-eligible list.

Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. Elementary (Baltimore City), which has 88 percent of students receiving free or reduced-price meals, improved 19 composite percentage points over last year. Its third-grade math score almost doubled (23.5 to 46.8).

Somerset County and Caroline County made particularly remarkable system-wide gains of 7.5 and 7.4 percentage points, respectively, in composite index in 2000.

Perryville Elementary (Cecil County), which has 25.2 percent of students receiving free or reduced-price meals and 30.5 percent of students in special education, has improved its composite by 38 percentage points since the first year of MSPAP.

The two schools showing the most improvement over the past year are Title I schools in Prince George’s County. Thomas S. Stone Elementary improved 31.2 composite index percentage points (to 46.0 from 14.8 in 1999). Forest Heights Elementary improved 29.4 points (to 57.8 from 28.4 the previous year).

Taking Note of the 2000 Maryland Report Card

Notable aspects of this year’s Maryland School Performance Report:

  • Rock Hall Elementary (Kent County) had the state’s highest composite score, with 89.0 percent of students meeting satisfactory.
  • Burleigh Manor Middle (Howard County) had the highest scores in three of six eighth-grade MSPAP content areas.
  • Triadelphia Ridge Elementary (Howard County), a two-year-old school, reached the state excellent standard in all six fifth-grade content areas and five of the six third-grade content areas.
  • Montgomery County’s Cashell Elementary had the state’s highest fifth-grade score in writing (83.1).
  • Bloomington Elementary/Middle (Garrett County) had 100 percent of students at satisfactory in eighth-grade math.

Kent County is the only system to meet satisfactory standards (70 percent or higher) in a content area. It met the standards in third-grade writing, mathematics, science, language usage and social studies.


MSDE Bulletin
School & Community Outreach Office
Maryland State Department of Education
200 W. Baltimore Street   Baltimore, MD 21201
Web site: www.msde.state.md.us

Ronald Peiffer  Assistant State Superintendent    410-767-0473

Neil Greenberger    Editor    410-767-0486

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